Skip to main content

The Big Show's Career Incomplete?


It's hard to say anything bad about the Big Show. For several decades now, the guy has been a solid staple for the WWE and for pro wrestling fans. At seven feet tall, and who knows exactly what he weighs in at (my guess is around four hundred pounds), The Big Show is truly a rarity in the industry. And that goes with a pretty distinct personality, as well as the charisma not often seen from those of similar size throughout wrestling history. 

Now in the twilight years of his career, as can be seen from the eye test of his diminishing mobility, Big Show's best days are now behind him. Because of this, the thought of Big Show's legacy came afloat during a recent appearance on an episode of Monday Night Raw. There is no question the WWE will induct the big fella into the Hall of Fame one day, but this very thought lingered for me as he graced my television screen - was Big Show's potential truly maximized? 

I'm not looking to place blame on the man Paul Wight, or even be one of those cynical fans who sit behind a keyboard and turn their noses up at everything. However, when one considers the true talent that is the Big Show - size, charisma, marketability, showmanship, agility, etc... - I'm not quite sure Big Show is revered as much as he could have been.

Let's take the obvious comparison, Andre the Giant. Whenever wrestling fans, old or new, hear the name of Big Andre, a certain perception floods to the surface. Domination. Grand. Crushing. Monster. Heck, even casual fans and non-pro wrestling fans know who Andre The Giant was. 

Not saying that Big Show needs to be this generation's version of Andre, but why not? In fact, with the natural tools that he offers, Big Show could have been bigger (no pun intended) than Andre ever was. More of a household name. Heck, I reckon, as Big Show closes his career, I still feel like the "giant/monster" edge to him has been gone for over a decade now only held up by the cheap feeling moniker of "The World's Largest Athlete". 

I guess it's WWE creative to blame (or maybe not?), but whenever I think of the career of Big Show, I think of him crying constantly in some dopey angle (his feud with Big Bossman, anyone?), or dressing up in parody outfits, or mixing it up with Floyd Mayweather and other random Wrestlemania attraction such as Akebono. It's gotten worst as of late as I've become so jaded to Big Show that sometimes I forget about his biggest asset as a character and wrestler - his size. These days, he's just another guy on the card - again, guys like him don't come around often. 

I miss the days when monsters on any given roster were just that, monsters, giants, men who changed the feel within the arena and the spectrum of your television watching when they entered the arena. Attractions who wowed and awwed the audience. Because truth be told, if you've seen Big Show live, the man truly is an intriguing belief to take in.

The WWE hit the jackpot once again with a large, athletic, big man, that had a long tenure in their company, but this time, wasted him away for short terms laughs and interest. Just my opinion, just blogging...

Maybe I'm looking too far into it, but Big Show's career isn't distinct when thinking about his legacy. It just fees wrong, disappointing, and well, incomplete. I'm not sure if there is time to save it, but Big Show should have so much more. So, so, so much more. 

Recently Read Posts

Sunday Sundown Rundown - 11/12/17

3 Up
1. Aly Raisman - Following the bravery of Mckayla Maroney and others in the #MeToo campaign, Raisman has stepped forward as the charges pile up for sexual abuse by former USA Gymnastics doctor, Larry Nassar. By the way, shame on USA Gymnastics for continuing to allow this culture. I shudder to think what else lies in the world of Gymnastics. 
2. New York Times - In a world where journalism - real journalism - is becoming harder and harder to find, The Times continues to break stories left and right, and did so again this week with the Louis CK piece. I think we all are tired of journalism wrapped in identity politics, and yes, even "fake news". 
3. Kristaps Porzingis - Obviously, you all know how much I love the Unicorn. But seriously, how enjoyable is he to watch? And barring injury, he can only get better. Melo, who? 
3 Down
1. Sean Hannity - Seriously, I don't even know how this guy sleeps at night. And really, I'm not even sure what kind of person follows thi…

Pondering Picture #82

I snapped this photo in midtown Manhattan following a meeting with believe it or not, various professors from my alma mater of Cazenovia College. It was tremendous catching up with them all, especially considering it's been ten-plus years since I've seen them. 
Sometimes, honestly, it's almost like I forget I spent four years in upstate New York. And when I am reminded of it, often I am amazed in how a such a small town helped prepare me to tackle the big city, New York City - my home. 
Life is crazy.

Dome Pondering Movie Review: The Big Sick (2017)

What is it about?

The true story of Pakistani-born, Kumail Nanjiani who falls in love with Emily. After she becomes ill with a mysterious illness, Kumail must come to grips with various truths and culture clashes he's been avoiding. 
Who is in it? 
Kumail Nunjiani - Kumail
Emily - Zoe Kazan
Holly Hunter - Beth
Ray Romano - Terry

WWE Battleground 2014: Usos vs. The Wyatts, and Well, Just Get Ready For SummerSlam!

I really didn't have much interest in WWE Battleground last night. It just felt like another WWE PPV with another new name that really didn't have much meaning other than stamping another event with a pointless description until SummerSlam. And to be honest, the recent string of WWE TV hasn't been the most entertaining in my eyes. Maybe it's just me, but I haven't been excited. Just meh. WWE just seems to be spinning their wheels a midst the doldrums of complacency and pitching the WWE Network every chance they have. 
Nonetheless, WWE Battleground wasn't all that terrible in my eyes. Here are some quick thoughts from last night's event: