Friday, January 29, 2010

How Great is the Power of Loneliness?

Mightier than the sword and the pen.

At the root from which temptation stems.

My fingers begin to slip,

Into the Devil’s hand who extends.

 

Loneliness is an unequivocal nightmare.

A constant reminder.

Alone. By yourself. On your own.

You have no help.

 

You think of the old friend, you see their back.

Think about the friend you wish you had,

Who makes you think back,

To the old friend who turned their back.

 

All of the others who you embrace,

To feel comfortable, to feed your ego,

to protect your insecurities,

to pretend, to hide your true face.

 

Your darkness is lit by that candle.

It covers the greatest fear in your life.

Afraid of dreams becoming memories,

And memories becoming ghosts.

 

A never-ending nightmare,

With no awakening in the future,

No idea where this nightmare will go,

And a desperate soul reaching to the depths of hell for help.

 

Loneliness has no boundaries,

Regardless of the impermeability.

Eventually slipping into slumber,

Shaking with fear – the nightmare is there.

 

“Yet, we do know,

Where we all should go,

After their loneliness

Has got to them.”

 

To the alpha, the omega.

The creator, the savior.

He opens eyes during nightmares,

Grabs your hand, and removes the one extended.

Thursday, January 28, 2010

A Look at The State of the Union Address

After one year in office as president of the free world, President Obama strapped into the  chamber’s pulpit to deliver his first State of the Union address. An address that was anticipated as it lets the American people in on what to expect, how the mess of the past will be taken care of, and the blue print for the remaining three years of his term.

President Obama’s address was one of the most interesting addresses in the past few years. He touched on the glaring issues facing our nation (Economy, Jobs, Unemployment), pushed for continued reform to health care, and even called for Democrats and Republicans to quit attempting to undermine one another, and focus on the greater good of the American people.

The aura and the feeling in the chamber indeed resonated through the television screen. The feeling of the skepticism and cynicism of the reds combined with the awkward, over-joyous behavior of dems was one that created a unique environment, yet brought out a certain edge, a certain reality in President Obama.

President Obama is a tremendous speaker, which often causes many to support everything he dishes out, which is very dangerous. Nonetheless, with that in mind, Obama delivered in his first State of the Union Address. It was an interesting address that delivered some good messages and proposals, coupled with some questionable comments and yes, a few eye brow raising ideas.

Here are some viewpoints and quotes on President Obama’s first State of the Union Address:

“For these Americans and so many others, change has not come fast enough. Some are frustrated; some are angry. They don't understand why it seems like bad behavior on Wall Street is rewarded, but hard work on Main Street isn't; or why Washington has been unable or unwilling to solve any of our problems. They're tired of the partisanship and the shouting and the pettiness. They know we can't afford it. Not now.”

This is very true. A statement that jumped out at at me during his speech and in the text. It is one that is felt across the nation by many. Despite the disagreement from republicans and endorsers of the free-market system, something had to be done in order to sustain a falling economy.

“Our most urgent task upon taking office was to shore up the same banks that helped cause this crisis. It was not easy to do. And if there's one thing that has unified Democrats and Republicans, and everybody in between, it's that we all hated the bank bailout. I hated it. I hated it. You hated it. It was about as popular as a root canal.

But when I ran for president, I promised I wouldn't just do what was popular — I would do what was necessary. And if we had allowed the meltdown of the financial system, unemployment might be double what it is today. More businesses would certainly have closed. More homes would have surely been lost.”

A quote that always causes one to think back to the beginning of the entire collapse. How greed, deceit, and yes, greed again, caused the current mess that we all are in. Also, a good point of driving home that what is popular, may not always be right.

“There are stories like this all across America. And after two years of recession, the economy is growing again. Retirement funds have started to gain back some of their value. Businesses are beginning to invest again, and slowly some are starting to hire again.

But I realize that for every success story, there are other stories, of men and women who wake up with the anguish of not knowing where their next paycheck will come from, who send out resumes week after week and hear nothing in response. That is why jobs must be our No. 1 focus in 2010, and that's why I'm calling for a new jobs bill tonight.”

Although the rebound in the economy is minimal in evidence and perception,  President Obama should have never placed jobs on the back burner in 2009 for healthcare reform. The need for both is understood, but with jobs, comes the affordability of health care and choice of plans. Nonetheless, it was nice to see him use this platform to make this declaration.

“Tomorrow, I'll visit Tampa, Fla., where workers will soon break ground on a new high-speed railroad funded by the Recovery Act. There are projects like that all across this country that will create jobs and help move our nation's goods, services and information.

We should put more Americans to work building clean energy facilities — and give rebates to Americans who make their homes more energy-efficient, which supports clean energy jobs. And to encourage these and other businesses to stay within our borders, it is time to finally slash the tax breaks for companies that ship our jobs overseas, and give those tax breaks to companies that create jobs right here in the United States of America.”

The injection of infrastructure jobs is an idea that sounds good in theory, but one that still sounds skeptical based upon the limited sample pool for it. As for the continued government interruption in businesses and their actions, I am still torn on this issue. There is too much government involvement in the market, yet, this country needs to do what is necessary in order to get back on track.

“You see, Washington has been telling us to wait for decades, even as the problems have grown worse. Meanwhile, China is not waiting to revamp its economy. Germany is not waiting. India is not waiting. These nations — they're not standing still. These nations aren't playing for second place. They're putting more emphasis on math and science. They're rebuilding their infrastructure. They're making serious investments in clean energy because they want those jobs. Well, I do not accept second place for the United States of America.”

Very motivating, but also a reality check. Sometimes as Americans we get caught up in our own bravado and we forget how much the rest of the world has indeed advanced.

“Now, one place to start is serious financial reform. Look, I am not interested in punishing banks. I'm interested in protecting our economy. A strong, healthy financial market makes it possible for businesses to access credit and create new jobs. It channels the savings of families into investments that raise incomes. But that can only happen if we guard against the same recklessness that nearly brought down our entire economy.

We need to make sure consumers and middle-class families have the information they need to make financial decisions. We can't allow financial institutions, including those that take your deposits, to take risks that threaten the whole economy.”

Government involvement in our businesses needs to be limited. However, like everything in life, our market needs regulation. It is one of the major ways we ended up in this mess.

“Fourth, we need to invest in the skills and education of our people.

Now, this year, we've broken through the stalemate between left and right by launching a national competition to improve our schools. And the idea here is simple: Instead of rewarding failure, we only reward success. Instead of funding the status quo, we only invest in reform — reform that raises student achievement, inspires students to excel in math and science, and turns around failing schools that steal the future of too many young Americans, from rural communities to the inner city. In the 21st century, the best anti-poverty program around is a world-class education. And in this country, the success of our children cannot depend more on where they live than on their potential.

When we renew the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, we will work with Congress to expand these reforms to all 50 states. Still, in this economy, a high school diploma no longer guarantees a good job. That's why I urge the Senate to follow the House and pass a bill that will revitalize our community colleges, which are a career pathway to the children of so many working families.”

A great idea, however, I’ve always believed that a person that wants to better him or herself will do just that, regardless of the amount of resources there are. Education is very important, however, the amount of value our society has emphasized on education has declined – and not because of opportunity or resources.

“To make college more affordable, this bill will finally end the unwarranted taxpayer subsidies that go to banks for student loans. Instead, let's take that money and give families a $10,000 tax credit for four years of college and increase Pell Grants. And let's tell another 1 million students that when they graduate, they will be required to pay only 10 percent of their income on student loans, and all of their debt will be forgiven after 20 years — and forgiven after 10 years if they choose a career in public service, because in the United States of America, no one should go broke because they chose to go to college.”

Although the idea of cheaper tuition may sound great to current college students and parents, allowing tax credits for college and increasing Pell Grants, and giving breaks for specific fields is one that can ruin higher education. College is appreciated because of the sacrifices made to achieve and gain a degree. Making college easier to pay for with handouts, give outs, and gimmicks cheapens it, and builds upon the notion that the current administration is diminishing the American Dream.

“Here's what I ask Congress, though: Don't walk away from reform. Not now. Not when we are so close. Let us find a way to come together and finish the job for the American people. Let's get it done. Let's get it done.”

Despite the continuous cry for healthcare reform, and the various degrees of opinion on this, his stance on getting it done was appreciative. Not when you’ve come this far. Get something done that is feasible.

“At the beginning of the last decade, the year 2000, America had a budget surplus of over $200 billion. By the time I took office, we had a one-year deficit of over $1 trillion and projected deficits of $8 trillion over the next decade. Most of this was the result of not paying for two wars, two tax cuts and an expensive prescription drug program. On top of that, the effects of the recession put a $3 trillion hole in our budget. All this was before I walked in the door.

Now — just stating the facts. Now, if we had taken office in ordinary times, I would have liked nothing more than to start bringing down the deficit. But we took office amid a crisis. And our efforts to prevent a second depression have added another $1 trillion to our national debt. That, too, is a fact.”

A quote that is indeed fact. Although it sounds like a jab at the previous administration (and probably was intended as so), statistics and facts such as the ones in the quoted shed light on the current decline our nation has been in.

“I'm absolutely convinced that was the right thing to do. But families across the country are tightening their belts and making tough decisions. The federal government should do the same. So tonight, I'm proposing specific steps to pay for the trillion dollars that it took to rescue the economy last year.

Starting in 2011, we are prepared to freeze government spending for three years. Spending related to our national security, Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security will not be affected. But all other discretionary government programs will. Like any cash-strapped family, we will work within a budget to invest in what we need and sacrifice what we don't. And if I have to enforce this discipline by veto, I will.”

Sounds great, but not convinced it will happen. In fact, there are doubts about finishing 2011 without government spending.

And in Afghanistan, we're increasing our troops and training Afghan security forces so they can begin to take the lead in July of 2011, and our troops can begin to come home.

A date to be held accountable to. Another comment that evicts the wait-and-see approach.

“Unfortunately, too many of our citizens have lost faith that our biggest institutions — our corporations, our media, and, yes, our government — still reflect these same values. Each of these institutions are full of honorable men and women doing important work that helps our country prosper. But each time a CEO rewards himself for failure, or a banker puts the rest of us at risk for his own selfish gain, people's doubts grow. Each time lobbyists game the system or politicians tear each other down instead of lifting this country up, we lose faith. The more that TV pundits reduce serious debates to silly arguments, big issues into sound bites, our citizens turn away.

No wonder there's so much cynicism out there. No wonder there's so much disappointment.”

Definitely the truth.

and finally…

“The spirit that has sustained this nation for more than two centuries lives on in you, its people. We have finished a difficult year. We have come through a difficult decade. But a new year has come. A new decade stretches before us. We don't quit. I don't quit. Let's seize this moment — to start anew, to carry the dream forward and to strengthen our union once more.”

Amen.

Sunday, January 17, 2010

Dome Pondering Movie Review: Sugar (2008)

DPReviewSugar What’s it about?

A baseball player from the Dominican Republic leaves his family and earns his way out of a Dominican baseball academy to Single-A baseball in the United States. Along the way of chasing his dream of playing in the big leagues, he endures the rigors of a trying odyssey that often goes untold with so many foreign players. He goes through various trials and tribulations that mold him and help him find his place in this world.

Who is in it?

Algenis Perez Soto – Miguel “Sugar” Santos

Rayniel Rufino – Jorge Ramirez

Thursday, January 14, 2010

Initial Thoughts on Haiti Earthquakes

As I write this, I’m not even sure how to convey the feelings and thoughts that I have over the events that have taken place in Haiti. It seems that Mark McGwire’s confession, Lane Kiffin’s exodus to USC, American Idol and whatever else are as meaningless as they really are in the grand scheme of things.

In attempt, and to begin, I could say that I have been fortunate enough to grow up in a place such as New York City, a place that is diverse in every way imaginable. A place that is home to the largest population of Haitians in the United States. Due to that, I was able to encounter, experience, and appreciate the Haitian culture and most importantly, the kind of love the culture embraces.

Many of my friends growing up were from Haitian families, and a few of those friends are still some of my closest friends today. And through my friendship with them, my experience with the culture, what I have learned from other Haitian-Americans in New York City, combined with the roots of my family being from the Caribbean, I felt a connect with the nation and its current situation.

So on a day after such destruction hit, part of me finds myself in despair. Confused. Sad. And guilty, yes guilty. Guilt for sometimes taking for granted the blessings we have here in the United States.

Haiti has always been a nation that has struggled in many ways. In fact, I learned today that it is the Western Hemisphere’s poorest nation. A description and fact that I found to be eye opening, yet, not quite shocking.

Through the corrupt political actions, various illnesses, hurricanes, mudslides, hunger strikes, and now earthquakes, Haiti, a country between and surrounded by so many other sufficient nations (including being connected to the Dominican Republic), seems to have always found wrath’s hand. A wrath that almost seems, and I believe is, Devine in design.

However, as I continue to struggle in sorting out these feelings, I look at a nation that was already struggling in its existence, and now finds itself without water and electricity, with buildings collapsed around them, with prisoners let loose from the destruction, with little to no way of communicating to relatives in the States, and with tens of thousands presumed dead, I can’t imagine how one of my closest friends, who cannot get in touch with his family must feel.

My prayers and thoughts to the people and families of Haiti.

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

Say What? Glenn Beck’s Comments on Race, Correct.

Lets just get this out of the way – I admit it. I agree with Glenn Beck.

What?

No, I don’t agree with Glenn Beck’s views on President Obama, our current governmental leadership, or his comment that President Obama is racist (which is beyond insane). In fact, I rarely agree with Beck as he makes a lot of crazy, absurd, and over-the-top comments to rile up viewers, create debates, and most importantly keep his name (and his media programs) in the forefront.

However, Beck often makes his opinion known on certain topics, and his latest point of view regarding the upcoming United States census is one that is very interesting…one that yes, I agree with.

The new census forms set to begin distribution, fired up Beck due to three particular choices given to respondents, “Black”, “Negro”, “African-American”. Beck, known for letting his tongue loose had the following comments:

“African-American is a bogus, PC, made-up term. That is not a race. Your ancestry is from Africa, and now you live in America. Okay, so you were brought over, either your family was brought over in the slave trade, or you were born here and your family immigrated here, or whatever. But that is not a race. Negro used to be — is it still — not acceptable, is that still the clinical term, I don’t know, It has negative connotations in this country. But what I’m asking is: what are the clinical categories?”

The comments made has led to many anti-Beck comments. However, Beck did not say anything that isn’t necessarily false or offending, but raised a fair point. As a person of color, what exactly are the categories indeed?

Despite the leader in the free world being a man of color, issues like this prove that we as a nation aren’t as close to where we should be on race relations and communications.

The term “African-American” is completely bogus. And to be honest, so are “Asian-American” and other continent-American titles. Such titles do not describe race, but ethnicity and place of origin.

In specific cases such as Dave Matthews and Charlie Theron who are both South African born, white, and now U.S Citizens – they are not considered “African-American”. And why not?

How about an Indian born person that lives in our country, are they Asian-American?

The term “negro” should not be an active label. It’s a word that is tied directly to some of the worst times this nation has ever endured.

The truth is our nation is still uncomfortable in how to address this issue.

Despite our growth and continuing understanding of others who are different, there are some issues that we all need to deal with. And part of that is dealing, communicating, and interacting with people of color without offending them.

In my personal experience, there are friends that I’ve known for years who are uncomfortable in dealing with people of color, afraid of being offensive, and paranoid of how they themselves will be viewed.

Beck is right.

We’ve become so immersed in being politically correct, we’ve forgotten how to be real, how to be genuine, and most importantly, how to be a person.

For in the end, we create more barriers between us than there actually are.

Sunday, January 10, 2010

Dome Pondering Movie Review: Obsessed (2009)

DPMovieReviewObsessed What’s it about?

A executive president with a wife and child has his entire life placed in jeopardy after a temp worker from his office becomes obsessed and begins stalking him.

Who is in it?

Idris Elba – Derek Charles

Beyonce Knowles – Sharon Charles

Ali Larter – Lisa Sheridan

Saturday, January 09, 2010

Dome Pondering Movie Review: I Love You Man (2009)

DPMovieReviewILoveYouManWhat’s it about?

A friendless man goes on a series of “man-dates” to search for his best man at his upcoming wedding.

Who is in it?

Paul Rudd – Peter Klaven

Rashida Jones – Zooey Rice

Jason Segal – Sidney Fife

Friday, January 08, 2010

A Global World Series? Have a Little Faith in Selig

DPGlobalWorldChamp In a story that is sure to rile up baseball traditionalists, and other members of the anti-Bud Selig club, Major League Baseball and Nippon Professional Baseball are working on an agreement to set up a meeting of the two leagues’ champions in a Global World Series.

MLB Commissioner, Bud Selig, who is set to retire in 2012, has made the project a priority, and would like to have it installed before he drifts off into the sunset.

However, once again, with change to the game of baseball and its rules, there is opposition to installing such a sector of the post season which would guarantee a real world champion.

Many are already opposing the idea with various claims of ruining the integrity and tradition of the game. Without details set, and logistics solidified, some are even stating that it extends the baseball season too long, which would then be from February to November, and even longer on years including the World Baseball Classic.

And although baseball fans (some who just agree to be within the majority thinking) believe that Bud Selig has been a terrible commissioner, I believe he has been of the best things to happen to baseball during this generation.

The same traditionalist who are sighing in disbelief and moaning at the idea of a global world series are the same group that cried over the installation of the Wild Card in both leagues, and the expansion of post season play. They are the same collection of people who called the World Baseball Classic a terrible idea. The exact mob thinking that claimed the all-star game should not determine home-field advantage in the World Series. And the ideal know-it-alls that said interleague play would ruin the World Series.

Yet, each and every time, Selig’s changes have proven profitable, and beneficial for the game. Selig has even gone to bat (no pun intended) for the fans in such scenario as battling major networks like FOX to start World Series games at an earlier time, creating the MLB Network, televising the MLB draft, and current talks to place more emphasis on collegiate baseball (Possibly MLB Network).

Yeah, well what about a salary cap? He implemented revenue sharing over a salary cap. Revenue sharing doesn’t work!

Fans have seen more champions and teams in the playoffs in MLB than any other American sport. Heck, more teams in MLB have since financed deals for new or for renovating stadiums than any other professional league in the world! Revenue sharing does work! The same fans that cry over the lack of a salary cap are the same fans that do not watch when great World Series like the Anaheim Angels and San Francisco Giants (2002) or the Tampa Bay Rays and Philadelphia Phillies (2008) happen.

But I’ll digress.

Over the past two decades, Selig has incorporated several faucets into Major League Baseball that has modernized the game, and most importantly, served as a catalyst to its growth.

A global world series between the winner of the MLB World Series and the NPB champions would be a great way to crown true world champions of baseball.

Why would players want to play another series?

I doubt if players such as Derek Jeter, Jimmy Rollins, or Albert Pujols had the opportunity to play on such a stage they would decline. Most players are all about being the best, and if playing another round would give them that title, they would be all in. In fact, think about a matchup between this year’s champions – New York Yankees and Yomiuri Giants? The game’s most recognizable team from their respective country. You can’t script that kid of bedlam.

Wouldn’t it diminish the World Series?

No. The World Series will always be MLB’s biggest stage. It will remain that way.

What’s the point of doing this?

As stated before, it advances and globalizes the game. Getting the game on a national stage is as important as ever. As much as Americans tout the dominance of the National Football League, no one cares for the sport beyond our borders. How about the CFL? It's made up of mostly former American players.

This will be a another great way to see international talent while strengthening the World Baseball Classic and the game of baseball worldwide.

Yet, after all of that, I’m sure that there are readers out there, maybe even you reading this, that believe this is still a bad idea. However, I propose a one year trial. A three game series in Hawaii, easily accessible for both parties and a perfect climate for baseball.

After all Selig has done to modernize and globalize the game of baseball, it’s worth a try.

Thursday, January 07, 2010

Agent Zero (I.Q.)

DomePonderingGilbertArenas Apparently Gilbert Arenas has never heard of Plaxico Burress.

On the heels of the NBA suspending Arenas without pay for his tryst with firearms in his locker, everyone must be asking, what in the world was Arenas thinking?

Arenas does have licenses for the firearms that were flaunted in the Washington Wizards locker room, when he and Javaris Crittenton played their version a wild wild west draw. However, like Burress, Arenas’ guns were registered in another state. Despite that fact, Arenas playing and drawing real-life guns as if they were super-soakers in a jokingly manner over a $25,000 bet exhibits the kind of macho bravado with child-like behavior that Arenas has come to be known for.

A few years ago, yours truly wrote a piece endorsing Arenas for an NBA All-Star Game (Arenas Showing World That We Are Indeed Fools). Then, Arenas began to show the type of player that we all have come to know. Talented. Unbelievably talented. He had a chip on his shoulder. He wanted to prove everyone wrong. From being skipped over for the United States Olympic Team, to being snubbed for the All-Star team, Arenas had a motive – that he belonged. It was why he chose to wear number 0 – to remind himself of what everyone thought of him at one point.

However, 0 now stands for the level of I.Q. Arenas is displaying regarding his NBA career.

It is understood that gambling is a huge part of some professional athletes lives. Heck, it has been a part of American culture for as long as history allows. Michael Jordan and Charles Barkley have been known to endure such habits, so the lifestyle is understood.

However, the need for guns in the locker room? Why? 

No answer is at all logical in answering that question. Heck, PaDomePonderingGilbertArenas2xico Burress had more of a logical answer for carrying a gun into a nightclub!

Guns stashed in your locker? Hmmm, yeah…sorry.

Now Arenas faces an indefinite suspension from David Stern, and a possible void of his 6 year, $111 million contract.

I hope that $25,000 bet was worth it.

***

And since we are on the topic of basketball players that just don’t get it, what is with Jayson Williams? The former New Jersey Net standout beat a trial in which he faced the max sentence of life in jail for killing his limousine driver. Now, Williams is back in the news after crashing his vehicle while intoxicated. Sometimes, second-chances aren’t enough for those who do not understand it.

Wednesday, January 06, 2010

The Big Unit: “One of the Best Player’s Ever to Wear a MLB uniform”

Dome PonderingBigUnit After twenty-two years of service, “The Big Unit” Randy Johnson finally has decided to retire from professional baseball. While the news may just gain a blurb or a highlight package in certain media circles, Johnson’s career should not be understated – he was one of the best player’s ever to wear a Major League uniform.

While I understand that he was never a popular guy amongst the media (especially here in New York) or was highly marketable, “The Unit” was one of the rarest combination of physical uniqueness and remarkable talent that this earth has ever bear witness to. There have been various pitches who have been physically intimidating, but few were intimidating and talented, if at all, at least one, was able to do so, and that was Randy Johnson.

As he stood on the mound with his 6’10'’ bird-like, wiry frame, Johnson’s wind up and follow through looked more like he was taking one giant step towards home plate while throwing 97mph-plus. Not fair. And when he felt like being mean, he whipped that sharp slider that still haunts lefty hitters in their sleep. Not fair at all.

Johnson, who finished as a member of the elite 300 club, with a record of 303-166, and finished second all-time in strikeouts with 4,875, did so during a notorious offensive inflated time we have all come to know as the “Steroid Era”. Add in the various complete games, no-hitters, and on May 18th, 2004, in Atlanta, where he was perfect.

Johnson’s statistics speak volumes about his career. Till this day, it is amazing to look at his 2001 season with the Diamondbacks:

21-6; 2.49 ERA; 372 K’s (!!)

Unbelievable.

Although my immediate memories of Johnson were not the greatest such as his time as a New York Yankee (His second season), or his time shutting down the New York Yankee (Basically anytime he pitched against them), Johnson has always been one of my favorite pitchers to watch.

As he finally hangs it up for good, it will be sad to see him go. I’ll miss that view of that tall imposing figure hiding his weapon of choice behind his glove, while blocking his face, ready to unwind one of the greatest things the sport has ever seen. However, even more so privileged that I had the opportunity to watch him, Pedro Martinez, Roger Clemens, and Greg Maddux over the past few years.

Tuesday, January 05, 2010

Never Never Land (Part II): Review of January 4th

Hitman.HBK2 What a night January 4th was! From the buzz on the internet, the reactions from wrestling fans, and the sheer excitement of what the future holds, the night was a total success. Like I described in the first part of this series (Never Never Land), as the clock creeped toward the eight o’ clock hour I found myself with jubilee that was borderline embarrassment. The kind of embarrassment that had my tag team partner probably wondering just how great is this addiction of pro wrestling that yours truly suffers from? 

However, she is new to this addiction. She doesn’t understand the connection to my (and others) childhood that this addiction holds, and the nostalgia that is and were the Monday Night Wars. Even though, to her only one show existed on January 4th, as she despises Vince McMahons company, it was obvious there was a bit of curiousness of what each show would bring.

Hitman.HBKYet, that is why January 4th was exciting. New fans of professional wrestling were able to experience just a small taste of how great the late 90’s/early 00’s were, current fans were finally given an option on Monday Nights, and old fans that tuned out, tuned back in to see what all the craze was about. 

And although Raw pulled a 3.5 plus rating, and TNA earned it’s highest rating ever of 1.5, both shows were great. From Hogan’s comeback to the business, Ric Flair’s comeback, a new era in TNA, and an unbelievable match between Kurt Angle and AJ Styles, the biggest story of the night was the reconciliation of Shawn Michaels and Bret Hart. 

Two of the all-time greats, who were rivals inside the ring, and even greater enemies in their personal lives finally buried the hatchet and put the issue of the Montreal Screwjob to bed. By far the best moment of the night, and one that this Hitman fan will never forget. 

All in all, a great night that lived up to the expectation. Rumors are that TNA may move iMPACT to Monday Nights due to the success of the trial run. Hopefully it happens, so January 4th could be just the beginning, and Never Never Land can reopen every Monday Night.

Sunday, January 03, 2010

Never Never Land

DomePondering Never Never Land

Never say “never” in the wrestling business.

Every wrestling fan has heard that phrase in regards to the industry that they love. In wrestling, where the demand for talent is high, the value of trust is low, and the crap shoveled behind-the-scenes due to politics is as high as the Appalachians, one would think that “never” would would indeed be a real concept.
Prone for broken relationships and bridges, the wrestling business has seen scenarios develop beyond the entertainment product and more real than life itself, still defy those justifications for the feud to continue, as clearer skies prevailed. However, with all the broken relationships, bridges, and deceit that were eventually amended, one chapter remained unfinished – Bret Hart.

Saturday, January 02, 2010

Dome Pondering Movie Review: Sunshine Cleaning (2008)

DPMovieReviewSunshineCleaning
What’s it about?


After her son is removed from school, a mom begins an unusual business of biohazard removal/crime scene clean up service with her enigmatic and unreliable sister. Through her desperation and operation of the business she learns more about herself, her son, her father, and that life is indeed the messy business.

Who is in it?

Amy Adams – Rose Lorkowski

Emily Blunt – Norah Lorkowski

Alan Arkin – Joe Lorkowski

Jason Spevack – Oscar Lorkowski